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The Kim Kardashian West Phenomenon

We’re living in a #goals obsessed generation. Since the rise in social media, price online it’s made it a lot easier to not only keep up with the Kardashians, sildenafil but the busy lives of other people (mainly celebs) life allowing us to have more access meanwhile using their platform to maintain their brand image and further connect with followers. I for one celebrate social media, and all it’s intricacies, it’s a beautiful thing, but just like anything else that is online, it doesn’t always mean it represents a person’s reality. It’s not only social but can be just the surface of a person or company.

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Over recent months, I’ve started to notice the word “goals”, being used on posts such as stunning couples you can be both happy for and a smidgen envious over #relationshipgoals. Over the 2.4 family who seem to have the perfect life both online and offline taking selfies in the perfect car, owning the perfect dog, and taking the most perfect holidays #familygoals. Over the all women’s fitness babe page where they truly make you question why you’re eating that white chocolate chip cookie whilst scrolling through their posts and not doing a 5k run instead followed by a round of butt clenches #fitnessgoals, and the list goes on. The term #goals has been used on Instagram over 25 million times and that’s just one social media platform! But since when did goals start being formulated and set based on other peoples lives? To aspire to be like someone is one thing, to be inspired is another but to actually set that person’s life as the ultimate goal for how you want yours to be from a filtered snapshot is quite concerning.

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Truth is, we can feel like we know people online through what they choose to show us, but the truth is, we actually don’t. Knowing about someone, and knowing them personally are two different things. The goals definition in the Webster dictionary is something to do or achieve, but the unfortunate internet goals the majority of the time are something to attain no matter how ridiculously outlandish it may seem.

Goals is something that should be based on where you’re at in YOUR OWN life. Spending more time with family, moving into that dream career, learning that foreign language, opting for a healthier diet, clearing the overdraft, finally saving enough to put a deposit down for the house purchase. No matter how big or small the goal is, it’s your journey. It shouldn’t have anything to do with anyone else. That’s often where comparison can come in, and it’s pretty much a slippery slope downwards from there.

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The only person you should want to be better than is the person you were yesterday.

People on the whole, only post the best parts of their life and being the brand conscious girl that I am, I even do it! So by no means am I knocking it, but when goals are based off just a social media portrayal that’s unhealthy and dangerous because it then heightens our unrealistic expectations of life and makes us neglect our own realities.

Remember, their story is not your story, their struggles are not your struggles and their successes are not your successes.

 

Written by: Kibibe Bailey

Instagram: @mskibibebailey
We’re living in a #goals obsessed generation. Since the rise in social media, it’s made it a lot easier to not only keep up with the Kardashians, but the busy lives of other people (mainly celebs) life allowing us to have more access meanwhile using their platform to maintain their brand image and further connect with followers. I for one celebrate social media, and all it’s intricacies, it’s a beautiful thing, but just like anything else that is online, it doesn’t always mean it represents a person’s reality. It’s not only social but can be just the surface of a person or company.

(GIF)

Over recent months, I’ve started to notice the word “goals”, being used on posts such as stunning couples you can be both happy for and a smidgen envious over #relationshipgoals. Over the 2.4 family who seem to have the perfect life both online and offline taking selfies in the perfect car, owning the perfect dog, and taking the most perfect holidays #familygoals. Over the all women’s fitness babe page where they truly make you question why you’re eating that white chocolate chip cookie whilst scrolling through their posts and not doing a 5k run instead followed by a round of butt clenches #fitnessgoals, and the list goes on. The term #goals has been used on Instagram over 25 million times and that’s just one social media platform! But since when did goals start being formulated and set based on other peoples lives? To aspire to be like someone is one thing, to be inspired is another but to actually set that person’s life as the ultimate goal for how you want yours to be from a filtered snapshot is quite concerning.

(GIF)

Truth is, we can feel like we know people online through what they choose to show us, but the truth is, we actually don’t. Knowing about someone, and knowing them personally are two different things. The goals definition in the Webster dictionary is something to do or achieve, but the unfortunate internet goals the majority of the time are something to attain no matter how ridiculously outlandish it may seem.

Goals is something that should be based on where you’re at in YOUR OWN life. Spending more time with family, moving into that dream career, learning that foreign language, opting for a healthier diet, clearing the overdraft, finally saving enough to put a deposit down for the house purchase. No matter how big or small the goal is, it’s your journey. It shouldn’t have anything to do with anyone else. That’s often where comparison can come in, and it’s pretty much a slippery slope downwards from there.

(GIF)

The only person you should want to be better than is the person you were yesterday.

People on the whole, only post the best parts of their life and being the brand conscious girl that I am, I even do it! So by no means am I knocking it, but when goals are based off just a social media portrayal that’s unhealthy and dangerous because it then heightens our unrealistic expectations of life and makes us neglect our own realities.

Remember, their story is not your story, their struggles are not your struggles and their successes are not your successes.

 

Written by: Kibibe Bailey

Instagram: @mskibibebailey
Kim Kardashian West is a popular culture phenomenon, approved whether you’d like to admit it or not. Up until earlier this month, more about cameras followed Kim’s every step. The biggest names in fashion are queueing up to work with her. She has a legion of dedicated fans who support her multi-million dollar empire by religiously paying for app subscriptions, ampoule KIMOJI merchandise and selfie books. Kim works to raise awareness around important issues such as Armenian genocide, and gun control. She donates generously to a number of charitable causes, and was praised for doing so at Variety’s ‘Power of Women’ event last year. 

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Most of us will be aware by now that Kim was recently robbed at gunpoint in her apartment in Paris. Thankfully, she was unharmed, but the incident has raised a lot of questions about the extent to which Kim has opened herself up to such awful attacks. Comments on social media were varied- some people were compassionate, others (mostly men) didn’t think the burglars had gone far enough. They wished Kim had been raped and mutilated.

Surprisingly, the most shocking reaction for me came from Vanessa de Largie (an Australian self-proclaimed ‘feminist’ and sex columnist). After news of Kim’s ordeal broke out, Vanessa penned an article for The Daily Telegraph titled ‘I wanted Kim Kardashian to die’.

Personally, I don’t have an issue with Kim Kardashian West. I’ve watched her reality show for years, although I’ve never considered her lifestyle to be one that I’d actively try to emulate myself. I think she’s got a good sense of humour, and I’m happy to see her comfortable in her own skin. My phone wallpaper is collage of her many ‘crying faces’. They’re brilliant.

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I’m happy to listen objectively to any fair criticism. But I found Vanessa’s article to be mean-spirited, and completely baseless. Vanessa slates Kim for being “vapid” and having “nothing to offer to the world”. Her article talks about how concerned she is that young girls look up to Kim. Vanessa is disappointed that Kim has more online followers than Nelson Mandela. Crikey. She seems to have forgotten that Mandela passed away nearly three years ago. Vanessa has an issue with society putting KKW in the same bracket as her personal feminist icon Germaine Greer (who, FYI, also posed nude once upon a time).

It would be wrong of me to dismiss Vanessa’s comments as pure jealousy, although I think it’s important to recognise that envy does play a part in how some have reacted to Kim’s incident. Let’s face it, the majority of us would happily take a healthy pay check in return for looking good and doing very little ‘work’. Many people hate Kim simply because she seemingly does nothing. It’s hard for people to accept that a woman can lead such an opulent lifestyle without having to slave away for 40+ hours a week in an office job she despises. People with this mentality don’t care that Kim’s personal belongings were taken in such a violent way. After all, she probably deserved it for being so damn rich!

But if everybody could build an empire like Kim’s, we’d all be doing it. Nobody wants to commend Kim for her business acumen, which I think is disheartening to see. I don’t think she’s teaching young girls that they must walk around naked and pump themselves with Botox and fillers to be successful. If that’s really all you can take from Kim’s story, then you’re probably more shallow than you’d like to admit.

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Young girls all over the world literally kill themselves every day when they’ve fallen victim to revenge porn at the hands of somebody they once trusted. But Kim has shown young women that you don’t need to let such awful events define you. You’re able to shake it off, work hard and achieve anything you put your mind to.

My issue with the feminist movement is that we’re constantly trying to figure out what a feminist ‘looks’ like. Kim can’t be a feminist, because she’s naked all the time. A stay-at-home mum can’t be a feminist, because she’s allowing her husband to provide for the family. This is becoming tedious, and I’m not surprised that many women don’t like to label themselves as ‘feminists’ in fear of the backlash they’ll receive.

For me, feminism is not some exclusive club reserved for conservative white women who only started to see Donald Trump as a problem when he talked about sexually assaulting other white women. The movement needs to be completely intersectional. It needs to be about ALL women having the right to do whatever the heck they want to do. If they want to be naked, they can do that. If they want to stay at home and look after their children, why is that a bad thing? It’s dangerous for us to measure feminism depending on how much of her body a woman chooses to show. By doing that, we’re taking away a woman’s agency over her own body. And that is completely anti-feminist.

If Kim’s nude pictures bother you, then don’t look. Honestly, try it. It’s a lot easier to do than you think. We shouldn’t have to bear in mind that Kim is a wife and mother before we can empathise with her situation. At the end of the day, she’s a human being. Most reasonable people wouldn’t wish this ordeal on anybody, so let’s not lose all of our humanity and empathy just because this happened to Kim Kardashian West.

Written by Olamide Agboola

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